Opening Hours

Harley Street Medical Centre

Day Opening hours
Monday 26 February
8am to 6:30pm
Tuesday 27 February
8am to 1pm
2pm to 6:30pm
Wednesday 28 February
8am to 6:30pm
Thursday 29 February
8am to 6:30pm
Friday 1 March
8am to 6:30pm
Saturday 2 March
Closed
Sunday 3 March
Closed

Extended Hours

Extended hours appointments are available at various local clinics; please click here for more information.

When We Are Closed

Out Of Hours Care

Walk in Centres are available locally. The Haywood Hospital located on High Lane in Burslem.

NHS 111 Service

111 is the NHS non-emergency number. It’s fast, easy and free.

Call 111 and speak to an adviser, supported by healthcare professionals. They will ask you a series of questions to assess your symptoms and immediately direct you to the best medical care for you.

NHS111 is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Calls are free from landlines and mobile phones.

Please do not ask to see a doctor out of hours unless you genuinely cannot wait until the surgery re-opens.

NHS 111 Online

111 online is a fast and convenient alternative to the 111 phone service and provides an option for people who want to access 111 digitally. 

Your needs will be assessed and you will be given advice about whether you need:

  • Treat yourself at home
  • Go to a Primary Care Centre

If you need face to face medical attention you may be asked to attend a Primary Care Centre.

Click here to access NHS 111 online or call 111 to speak to a staff member.

Life-threatening emergencies

Call 999 in a medical emergency – when someone is seriously ill or injured and their life is at risk.

Medical emergencies can include:

  • loss of consciousness
  • an acute confused state
  • fits that are not stopping
  • persistent, severe chest pain
  • breathing difficulties
  • severe bleeding that cannot be stopped
  • severe allergic reactions
  • severe burns or scalds

Call 999 immediately if you or someone else is having a heart attack or stroke. Every second counts with these conditions. Also call 999 if you think someone has had a major trauma. Major trauma is often the result of a serious road traffic accident, a stabbing, a shooting, a fall from height, or a serious head injury.

Non-life-threatening emergencies

If it is not a life-threatening emergency and you or the person you are with does not need immediate medical attention, please consider other options before dialling 999:

  • self care at home
  • calling NHS 111
  • talking to a pharmacist
  • visiting or calling your GP
  • going to a local NHS walk-in centre
  • attending an urgent care centre or minor injuries unit
  • making your own way to your local A&E department – arriving in an ambulance does not mean you will be seen any quicker

Choose the best service for your needs, as this will ensure the ambulance service is able to respond to the people who need help the most.